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Back to School Tips, from the Government

Parents, it’s that time again to prepared for a new school year. Kids.gov wants to…

  • August 2, 2017

Parents, it’s that time again to prepared for a new school year. Kids.gov wants to make sure that you’re suitably prepared.

Kids.gov won’t help you find the best deals on backpacks or school supplies, but they have addressed some key issues:

  1. Stress: Is your child transitioning from one school to another? Navigating new people, changing bodies, and homeroom locations can cause anxiety. One suggestion for reducing the stress: help your child with time management skills to get homework done. It may ease one worry for both of you.
  2. Mobile devices: Teenagers can’t get enough of their phones when it comes to communicating with their friends. Help your teen learn online safety tips and how to recognize online stalkers.
  3. Bullying: Parents play a vital role in helping their children deal with bullying. Learn the warning signs and ways to address the situation at school or online.
  4. Safety: Riding the bus for the first time or walking to school is a big step for some children. Communicate with your children about safety rules on the bus. Another safety concern is teenagers driving to school for the first time. Consider setting ground rules for your new driver such as no texting while driving and wearing seat belts even for passengers.
  5. Healthy Eating: For some girls, moving from “tween” to “teen” may add pressure on appearances. Learn the signs of possible eating disorders among teenagers.
  6. Sleep: Adults know sleep is critical for success but children–especially teens–will fight you to stay awake during the school week, then want to sleep all weekend. Pre-school-aged children need 11-12 hours of sleep; school-aged children need at least 10 hours a night; and teens need about 9-10 hours, according to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.
  7. School Emergencies: Check with your child’s school administrator and learn what type of security plan and emergency alert system it uses. Make sure your information is up-to-date for getting messages.
  8. Vaccines: Your state board of education or local school district may have a list of required shots before your child can attend school. To ease any concerns about getting vaccinated, talk to your child before going to the doctor’s office.

You can find out more at at Kids.gov and visit USA.gov/explore.

This list serves to emphasize how many things parents have to worry about these days. It’s not just the bully on the playground anymore; now, parents have to worry about the cyber-bully as well.

And who doesn’t look at the “School Emergencies” item and not think about the horror of Sandy Hook? It’s a complicated and often scary world out there.

On the other hand, family life can be about strength, commitment and joy. One has to be mindful of stresses and dangers, but we can never forget the good stuff.

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