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U.S. Home Sellers Realized Highest Average Price Gain in 10 Years

U.S. homeowners who sold in the second quarter of this year realized an average price…

  • August 23, 2017

U.S. homeowners who sold in the second quarter of this year realized an average price gain of $51,000 since purchase — the highest average price gain since the same period in 2007, according to a report from property database curator ATTOM Data Solutions.

The report also shows that homeowners who sold in the second quarter had owned an average of 8.05 years, up from 7.85 years in the previous quarter and up from 7.59 years in Q2 2016 to the longest average homeownership tenure as far back as data is available, Q1 2000.

“Potential home sellers in today’s market are caught in a Catch-22. While it’s the most profitable time to sell in a decade, it’s also extremely difficult to find another home to purchase, which is helping to keep homeowners in their homes longer before selling,” said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president at ATTOM Data Solutions.

All-Cash Condo Sales Are Down

All-cash sales represented 28.9 percent of all single family and condo sales in Q2 2017, down from 31.3 percent of all sales in the first quarter, but up from 27.3 percent of all sales in Q2 2016 — the first annual increase in the share of cash sales since Q1 2013.

The share of U.S. single family home and condo sales sold to institutional investors (entities buying at least 10 properties in a calendar year) was 2.1 percent in the second quarter, up from 1.8 percent in the first quarter but down from 2.6 percent a year ago.

Counter to the national trend, 19 of the 73 metro areas (26 percent) posted year-over-year increases in the share of institutional investor purchases, including Memphis, Charlotte, Nashville, Baltimore, and Raleigh.

Going West

Among 118 metropolitan statistical areas with at least 1,000 home sales in Q2 2017 with previous sale information available, those with the highest average home seller returns were San Jose, California (75 percent); San Francisco, California (65 percent); Seattle, Washington (63 percent); Modesto, California (62 percent); and Denver, Colorado (62 percent).

Total distressed sales  — bank-owned (REO) sales, third-party foreclosure auction sales, and short sales — accounted for 13.4 percent of all single family and condo sales in Q2 2017, down from 17.1 percent in the first quarter and down from 15.2 percent in Q2 2016 to the lowest level since Q3 2007.

Find out more at http://www.attomdata.com.

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